change

Put on your Multiple Sclerosis superhero cape

I’m sitting in my favorite chair this morning as I write my thoughts down to start the day. My favorite throw blanket is lying across my lap and out my living room window I can see deer munching on some clover in the back yard. With coffee in hand, I smile at the beauty of a new day.

I enjoy my time of quiet solitude in the mornings. I use that time to collect my thoughts, reflect on times past and prepare myself for the day ahead. I read, I pray, and I sometimes cry. I try to plan my day out but know that those plans can change quicker than Garfield the cat can down a plate of lasagna.

Many of you live with a stable condition of multiple sclerosis. Your days are fairly predictable and you are able to plan ahead easily. You know what to expect and how to adjust to the changes that happen throughout the day. Then there are others, much like myself, who have such unpredictable days, you can’t plan well because MS changes too drastically from one moment to the next. Even in your planning, your plans often fail.

MS is a disease of change. I think we can all agree to that. Some deal with smaller and easier to manage changes, but it’s all still change.

It would be wonderful to know what a day will be like: to plan and be able to keep those plans, to go to parties without leaving early, to spend time with friends without falling asleep on them, to spring clean the house without regretting it later, or even to wash and detail the car without dropping the wash rag every few minutes.

Even though I have trouble doing some of the simplest of things in life, I try to do them anyway…and that’s what counts. I try to do as much as I can when I can and leave the rest to tomorrow.

If you can’t adapt to change, you will find your days hard to get through. For some, it’s not easy learning to go with the flow…to ride down the river of life rather than fighting with it.

It’s okay to end your day differently than you expected, leaving things still to be done. Don’t get frustrated because your house needs to be vacuumed and you don’t have the energy to do it at the moment. I don’t know of anyone with an un-vacuumed house that has stopped the world from spinning causing it to fall off its axis thus ending civilization as we know it. Your day will go on and the vacuuming can wait for another day.

Choose the important things in life to be your focus rather than the things of little importance. I’ve learned that many of the things that I thought were important really weren’t. Use your time wisely and know that YOU are what’s important, not what you can or cannot do.

You are valued, treasured and needed. So today, step into the changing room, put on your MS superhero cape and step out into the world. You got this!!!

MS Gets on My NervesMS WarriorMS Superhero  


About the Author
About the Author
Penelope Conway

Penelope Conway
Penelope started Positive Living with MS as a way to help others with MS stay positive in the midst of a terrible disease. She believes that staying positive and holding onto hope is the key to waking up each morning with the strength to get through the day. Multiple Sclerosis may never go away, but neither will her determination and her drive to help others through the journey.

26 replies
  1. Rodger Ashton-Smith
    Rodger Ashton-Smith says:

    Change is not unfamiley for me. I have had to put up with this for most of my life. It’s not only MS so when that ugly monster showed up it was just another change. There are new things to learn and grow on, but it is not the end but a beginning of another life. Whatever happens try not to lose yourself and who you are.

    Reply
  2. Wendy Temple says:

    Have been symptom free for just over a week (except for fatigue) and have attacked my house till it’s shining again. Hope to keep it that way but … Am going to try vitamin D and B see if that works. Not on any meds, they drove me crazy. Keep thinking happy thoughts, be positive, do what you can the rest can wait.

    Reply
  3. Debbie Walker says:

    How often on average is everyone having relapses? I haven’t relapsed since my diagnosis 2 yrs ago and I’m not on any meds. Just would like to know for more understanding of the disease. Thanks in advance

    Reply
    • Jackie Cheadle McKenzie-Jones says:

      Debbie, everyone is different. I found out last year I had it through a MRI that was done, had foot drop. Was told had it over ten plus years. I move slow and only get hot when not in front of a fan. I only take vit d and b complex, try eat healthy.

      Reply
    • Debbie Walker says:

      Jackie Cheadle McKenzie-Jones hi thank you for your response. I got diagnosed via MRI. I had the hug, optic neuritis and my right leg had drop foot too. I have everyday symptoms, like tingling & numbness but no relapse as of yet. In hindsight I probably had it for few yrs before but just put it down to sciatica until I developed major symptoms. I’m on Vit D too. Onwards and upwards 👍

      Reply
    • Rachel Fleming says:

      i just started prednisone today for my leg spasms/spasticity. since now, it has been about 3ish years, but i’m also on avonex and the last MRI showed my lesion was inactive, but that was about 3 years ago. i think (i hope) it’s my back. i had a bulging disc DXd at the same time of my MS DX and my legs are killing me. and so tight and rigid.

      and 5000 ius of D with dinner.

      Reply
  4. Tami Weiss
    Tami Weiss says:

    Thank you! I hope you get one thing accomplish today, Penelope, as well as myself. Have a beautiful day! 🙂 💝Gentle hugs!

    Reply

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