An Illustrated View of Multiple Sclerosis

MS Fact #1: Fatigue
MS Fact #2: Walking difficulties
MS Fact #3: Spasticity
MS Fact #4: Numbness
MS Fact #5: Vision Problems
MS Fact #6: Dizziness & vertigo
MS Fact #7: Bladder & bowel problems
MS Fact #8: Cognitive difficulties
MS Fact #9: Pain
MS Fact #10: Swallowing problems
MS Fact #11: Heat & cold intolerance
MS Fact #12: Speech problems
MS Fact #13: Emotional changes
MS Fact #14: Itching
MS Fact #15: Tremors
MS Fact #16: Breathing problems
MS Fact #17: Hearing loss
MS Fact #18: Sexual problems
MS Fact #19: Headaches
MS Fact #20: Seizures


MS Gets on My NervesTeam Mystery BruiseMS Superhero

1093 replies
« Older CommentsNewer Comments »
  1. Stephanie Riley
    Stephanie Riley says:

    This is awesome! I’m so glad this has popped up for me to see and share with my family and friends. They just don’t understand my fatigue and why I fall asleep so much and wherever I am. 😔

    Reply
  2. Greet Vervaeke says:

    That’s me! Even when Little children look at me, just because they don’t understand why my legs don’t work the way they should. I’m the one who will start tot comunicate with them. Sometimes, parrents are a shame because off the questions off the children. They shouldnot, when the Little ones understand, they will no more stare at disabled persons. they will understand it are people just like there mum and dad.

    Reply
  3. Tammy Denham says:

    I actually had a triage nurse at an ER tell me to go home and sleep it off when I fell into her desk. I have had nurses refuse to get me a wheelchair, one nurse told me to stand up or she would have to tell me to leave, while I was standing at the ER check in slowly slinking into the floor with only my 9 year old son to help me stand up. I expect it from people on the streets that I don’t know, but ER staff?

    Reply
  4. Olga M Soto says:

    Today I was invited to a church that I’ve never been before. After the service, I decided to introduce myself to the young pastor. We started talking about how was it that we came to turn our live to the Lord, as we were just sitting there talking, all of a sudden I feel the left side of my body sliding out of the chair I was sitting on and ended up on the floor in a very nasty way. You can just imagine the reaction of this young pastor, I scared him like you don’t have no idea. While on the floor, I had to explain to him, right there, that I had Multiple Sclerosis for 13 years and I have lots of weakness in the left side of my body. But not to panic, that all I had to do was to control my body, wait for it to calm down and then get up. And he just looked at me amazed and I explained to him that in the years that I’ve been suffering from this illness I have fallen many many times and I had to learn how to get back up without no help, for there’s been times when I’ve been alone and I had to get up by myself. He just looked at me and blessed me for learning how to manage this condition that is Multiple Sclerosis.

    Reply
  5. Diane Bustin says:

    I know this feeling so well. I have had to lay down on a bench at Disney and sleep for 10 min. while my husband kept watch , just to have enough strength to make it through the afternoon and once my husband and I were furniture shopping and I found a sofa and fell asleep right there in the store. When I reach that moment that I know I can not go one more step, that is it, Down I go.

    Reply
  6. Heather Adsit says:

    This was me yesterday after helping get my house ready for a bed.

    I’m glad my husband had his friend because I ended up cuddling with my kiddos.
    My body said no way. This is never fun :/

    Reply
  7. Lisa Krieg says:

    I knew something more had to be wrong with me before my diagnosis because I was just so fatigued all the time but all the doctors just thought I was depressed or getting a virus or not over my last virus. I don’t really blame them since I wasn’t presenting with any other symptoms to lead them to the MS dx. Knowing what I know now I did show other symptoms earlier on but hindsight is always 20/20!

    Reply
  8. Diane Serafin Cox says:

    So many people keep telling me , ” I know some one with MS and they do this and that with no problems ” Oh and they had it for years too. Well my daughter was diagnosed over 2 years ago and has all the problems no one sees. And she has to use a walker.

    Reply
    • Sherri
      Sherri says:

      Hi Diane, although we know most people mean well it is all too frustrating for me when I hear some say to me “so and so has MS and takes this vitamin or that is and doing great – maybe you should try it too”..Just like MS effects everyone differently, same goes for the treatments. I try and ‘educate’ people (in the nicest way possible) about the fact that although I have battled my MS for over 12 years and thanks be to God I am still able to be mobile and walk on my own, there are things people cannot visually “see” that we suffer with daily, and pain we face sometimes cannot be taken care of by taking a pill. And we have to be very careful with autoimmune disease, because a lot of what we are taking can have adverse effects on the medications we take if we mix in different supplements, etc. with our meds. So before I start anything – even a vitamin, I always suggest to everyone to speak with the neurologist first no matter what! I thank people for their advice, smile, and know that I will always do myself a favor and do what’s best for ME. What is best for me will not always be best for someone else with the same disease. I wish your daughter all the best fighting this MonSter. I am sorry she has to use a walker, and I pray she will remain as pain free as possible. God bless you and your family throughout this journey!

      Reply
  9. Linda Horrobin says:

    I remember seeing this at Salford royal when I went to their Getting to grips with MS seminar. I had only just been diagnosed. I wish I could have gone a little later after diagnosis. I think I would have benefited more. It was excellent though. xx

    Reply
  10. Amanda Michaud says:

    I am just now getting tested for MS because since July I have had nothing but issues from vertigo to know my legs going numb and having a hard time speaking. The doctors kept telling me it was stress and anxiety, I kept telling them no it’s not normal for a 30 not to be able to walk or hold her child. It’s so sad how doctors just push you to the side.

    Reply
    • Karolina Opauszki says:

      I had the same issues with doctors. I suffered for 8 months until I managed to get referred to a neurologist… they kept telling me oh bloods fine and you are only 25, you look fit….
      Anyway, I am 27 now and have active RRMS. Would love to see that physician again who was telling me I am healthy. I wish you all the best, hopefully soon you will have answers.

      Reply
    • Daniela Maksimović says:

      🙁 Ignored me in hospital for 24 days no balance, left eye stuck and could not read at all, was all blurry. And screwed part of the brain without therapy for that long now can`t get rid of double vision which they waited for to gave me a diagnose. When they discharged me from the hospital answer to my question how they came up with it, oh it hits eyes first?!? No shit, left eye stuck was not a sign for this long?? Even more is annoying when you have to prove main doctor you have relapse to give you a therapy??! And when they say no stress, honestly I`m stressed when I start dealing with you. >.< BTW weeks before that my neighbor he saw my blood results told me how `m faking and so healthy, how I have blood of the new born baby everything was sooo normal, and yet...oi. Take care. 🙂

      Reply
    • K
      K says:

      Go to another dr that knows ms. They have a drug name limtrada that helps to repair cells. I had ms for 23 yrs & took all the medicines. Now waiting to get approved by insurance. God bless you.

      Reply
      • Sherri
        Sherri says:

        Amanda,

        It took me almost 10 years to get my diagnosis. I had same symptoms as you did. It wasn’t until I moved to FL and went to a neurologist for ‘migraine’s’ that I was finally taken seriously for MS. He ordered an MRI that came back with a few lesions, then followed that up with a lumbar puncture (spinal tap) which came back positive. Those two tests combined with my history of symptoms are what finally diagnosed me. Go figure, I had to move to the sunshine state where Vitamin D is so very important for those of us with MS to get my diagnosis! Just thought that was ironic 😉 That was in 2005, 12 years later and I am still fighting but fighting it pretty well 🙂 P.S. I did Rebiff injections for a year, then Copaxone for a year, then finally Tysabri for almost 8 years. Loved Tysabri!!! Felt super great on that one but tested JC Virus positive and had to go off of it 🙁 Now on Aubagio for last 1.5 years and don’t feel as great, less energy, more neuropathy, but no new lesions! Good luck to you, hope you find a Neuro who can diagnose you soon!! Don’t give up :))

  11. Belinda Heard says:

    Hmm…I saw everything underneath in my ex husband…AND the very real downward slide into dementia. It’s the denial of these issues which is the real problem…but that’s just my opinion..

    Reply
  12. Lola Hale says:

    It’s a tricky situation, I put “show face” on a lot, especially at work. I don’t let many people see how much pain I am in or how fatigued I am which is why it’s nearly 11am on a Saturday morning and I am too fatigued and in pain to get out of bed yet.

    Reply
« Older CommentsNewer Comments »

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *