change

Changing with the unexpected

I’m sitting in my favorite chair this morning as I write my thoughts down to start the day. The air is cool. My favorite throw blanket is lying across my lap and I’m watching some deer in my back yard munching on dew soaked grass. I have a hot cup of coffee with me and my computer in my lap.

That’s a perfect morning for me. I enjoy my time of quiet solitude to collect my thoughts, reflect on times past and prepare myself for the day ahead.

Many of you live with a stable condition of multiple sclerosis. Your days are fairly predictable and you are able to plan ahead easily. You know what to expect and how to adjust to the changes throughout the day. Then there are others, much like me, who have such unpredictable days, you can’t plan well because MS changes too drastically from one moment to the next. Even in your planning you don’t plan well.

MS is a disease of change. Some deal with smaller changes, but it’s all still change. It would be so nice to know what a day will be like, to plan and be able to keep those plans, to go out with others without having to leave early, to spend time with friends without falling asleep on them. To spring clean the house, wash and detail the car, and cook a meal fit for a king. It’s been years since I was able to do any of those things. I try though, and that’s what counts. I try to do as much as I can when I can and leave the rest to tomorrow.

If you can’t adapt to change, you will find your days hard to get through. For some, it’s not easy learning to go with the flow…to ride down the river of life rather than fighting with it. It’s okay to end your day differently than you expected, leaving things still to be done. Don’t get frustrated because your house needs to be vacuumed and yet you don’t have the energy to do it at the moment. I don’t know of anyone with an un-vacuumed house that has stopped the world from spinning causing it to tilt on its axis thus ending civilization as we know it. Your day will go on and the vacuuming can wait for another day.

Choose the important things in life to be your focus rather than the things of little importance. I’ve learned that many of the things that I thought were important really weren’t. Use your time wisely and know that YOU are what’s important, not what you can or cannot do. So today, step into the changing room, put on your MS superhero cape and step out into the world. You got this!!!

MS Gets on My NervesMS WarriorMS Superhero  


About the Author

Penelope Conway

Penelope Conway
Penelope started Positive Living with MS as a way to help others with MS stay positive in the midst of a terrible disease. She believes that staying positive and holding onto hope is the key to waking up each morning with the strength to get through the day. Multiple Sclerosis may never go away, but neither will her determination and her drive to help others through the journey.

8 replies
  1. Peggy
    Peggy says:

    I too needed these messages Penelope! Perfect timing as I was feeling sorry for myself and telling my husband of all the things I can’t do because of MS. But I CAN do some things and as the words written here say the world hasn’t stopped spinning….😄

    Reply
  2. Rodger Ashton-Smith
    Rodger Ashton-Smith says:

    Thanks Penelope a comfortable thought. I have PPMS and that has proved had to really hard to deal with. But at the same time I try and do things by myself as much as possible. There are ways to get others to do what they don’t realize that it’s what you want to do. It’s a bit behavior modified type of thing to do but it sometimes works.

    Reply
  3. Roland R Clarke
    Roland R Clarke says:

    My SPMS is relatively stable, but I still need your words of wisdom and encouragement. I have a vague plan when I wake, but there are things that can upset that plan. Triggering an MS attack or meltdown seems to be easy if you are a screaming great-grand-kid.

    Reply

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