I get hurt in some of the weirdest ways

I have noticed that people living with multiple sclerosis get hurt in some of the weirdest ways. I know for me, I’ve had my fair share of bruises, broken bones and crazy predicaments that I wouldn’t have experienced any other way.

A couple of years ago I decided to sit out on my back porch to enjoy the beautiful day we were having. It was a little chilly out, but still a pretty day. I was barefoot, which normally I am, and took the few steps needed to get to my lawn chair.

As I walked out, I stepped on a tiny piece of wood that jabbed into my foot. I could feel the slight change in elevation under my foot, but no pain since much of that foot is numb. I checked the bottom of my foot and although it was bleeding, all seemed okay.

After a week, I noticed the sore it had created just wasn’t getting better. I waited probably way to long, but eventually went to the doctor to get it checked out. The x-rays were inconclusive so surgery was ordered since whatever was going on was much too deep for an office visit to remedy.

The doctor told me that when she cut into that area of my foot, sure enough, there was a piece of wood embedded super deep into my foot. I was told that had I not had it removed, it could have gotten really bad. I’m glad I had a doctor that was willing to do all that was needed to find out what was going on.

Yesterday I had another foot accident. (For some reason my feet seem to be the things I hurt the most.) I was in the bathroom transferring from my shower chair to my wheelchair when my feet slipped on the wet tiles. My body came crashing to the ground and my right foot jammed against the corner of the sink cabinet.

It was excruciatingly painful and when I looked at my foot, my third toe on my right foot was crooked…like really bad crooked. After making my way up from the floor and getting dressed, I tried to determine what was wrong. That toe seems completely broken and won’t move back to a normal position. I have an appointment to see the doctor today so we’ll see what’s up. Ugh…MS!

I have sprained ankles and wrists, gotten burned, cut myself, and broken bones all because my body wouldn’t cooperate. But you know what? I keep going. Sure I may have to lay up in the bed more than some people do, I may spend too much time in waiting rooms and doctor’s offices, I may require help doing some of the simplest of things ever, but I’m still going strong.

You can’t let your weaknesses and limitations stop you from living. They may slow you down but don’t let your slowness keep you from finding enjoyment in your day. Find your smile today…and if you can’t find one just imagine me sprawled out on the floor buck naked having to call a neighbor to come and help me get up. That will either make you laugh out loud or run away screaming in fright! Either way it will make your day better.

What stresses me out is unreliable and untrustworthy people

The crazy thing about living with multiple sclerosis is that stress can make your disease progression worse, but trying to avoid stress can be stressful thus putting you into a perpetual cycle of stress. Ugh…how stressful.

For me, the disease itself is not what stresses me out. It may take me ten minutes to pull myself up from the floor after I fall down or I may be unable to open an easy to open package even with the aid of a pair of scissors, a blow torch and a hand grenade, but I can work through those things given enough time and persistence.

What stresses me out is unreliable and untrustworthy people.

A few years ago when I began having trouble with my legs, a friend came to me and said she would like to take me to my physical therapy appointments. I was so grateful and thanked her for the offer. Driving for me was starting to become dangerous. The next day as I waited for her to pick me up, she was a no show. My phone calls to her went straight to voice mail, and because my therapy appointment was extremely important, I went ahead and drove myself.

I chalked it up to maybe she forgot. She returned my call while I was in therapy and left a message telling me she overslept that morning and apologized profusely. I forgave her and all was well between us.

A couple of days later, I called her early enough before my appointment as a reminder that I needed help. Once again my call went to voicemail, she didn’t show up so I drove myself. After that, even though I knew she wanted to help, her unreliability was not helpful so I found other ways to get to my appointments.

Just because someone has good intentions to do something doesn’t help a person in need. Good intentions make the doer feel good about themselves. They can go through their day patting themselves on the back saying look what I’m going to do, but it’s their actions that actually make a difference.

Over the years, I have had people say that they will come to my house to cut my hair so I don’t have to make a trip to the hairdresser, want to set up a cleaning schedule to help me with the cleaning of my bathrooms and kitchen, say they want to meet up for coffee and conversation, promise to stop by once a month to wash my van, and even say they will come over to cut my grass every other week…all without any followthrough.

But it’s the thought that counts, right? Well, actually no, it’s not.

Good intentioned people mean well, but without actions to back them up, those intentions mean nothing. Sometimes it’s better to step away from people who can’t be trusted in order to keep your sanity. And that’s okay to do. One thing I have learned over the years is that I don’t want to be a well intentioned, no action person. If I can’t follow through on what I say I want to do, then I just won’t say it.

I think the non-disabled world doesn’t understand just how much the small things they say they would like to do for us in order to help, matter. My philosophy: If you say you are going to do something, do it. Occasional changes are totally fine, just don’t make it an every time thing. Your word matters.

you are

You are a somebody

I had an extremely difficult time watching my career come to an end. It was the last thing I ever thought would happen, so when it did I took it hard. I did all I could to hide my cognitive problems from others. I fumbled my way through each day knowing that life was changing yet refusing to acknowledge those changes.

As a computer programmer, I could meet any challenge thrown at me and beat it. I developed some amazing systems and was proud of my accomplishments. When Multiple Sclerosis came along and began disrupting those abilities, I didn’t like it one bit. I would try programming but just couldn’t get my brain to work.

I struggled with everyday things too like trying to remember if I had washed my hair while in the shower, so I would wash it again just in case or forgetting I had something in the oven even with a timer set. Who could burn a casserole with a wonderful smell filling the house and a timer going off? Me!!! So, to get confused looking at code, the very code I, at one time, could decipher in my sleep…that was devastating.

The day I made my decision to resign, I cried. Not just one tear either, a flood and an ocean of tears. I covered it up well, but my heart was broken. Having to walk away from my job made me feel like a failure.

It’s been close to three years now and I still miss my job. I find myself trying to do in depth programing from time to time, but can’t seem to do it without a cheat sheet for even the simplest of tasks. I’m still smart, I’m still me…I’m still a somebody.

I do my best to stay focused on the big picture. My career wasn’t who I was. It was only a part of my life. I am so much more than the things I can do…and so are you. For some reason, we put our identity in things that don’t really determine who we are. You aren’t a chef, or a fireman, or a store clerk, or a nurse. You are an amazing, wonderful, strong, inspiring person who has a lot to give even in your weakest moments.

I know it’s scary, the unknown. “How will I? How can I? What about? What next?” I know, it’s terrifying to take a step forward when you can’t even see the road in front of you. But regardless of how you feel, I can tell you with confidence that you aren’t a failure, stupid or broken. You are a somebody…and being a somebody is the best thing anybody could ever be.