Multiple Sclerosis depression is a real thing

MS Depression is real. It’s not the same as being sad or feeling blue either. Everybody experiences moments of sadness and have times when the tears flow easily because of an unexpected life change, but with sadness the sun comes out, the tears dry up and life goes on.

Depression is more intense than just being sad. It’s felt deep, it hits hard and it lingers for days, months and sometimes even years without a true grasp as to why. It’s not a part of your imagination or something that you’ve made up.

Life changes living with a chronic illnesses. It changes daily and that can be a hard thing to deal with…living a life filled with uncertainty and constant change. One day you may wake up feeling great and the next day you find you can’t even get out of bed. That kind of turbulence has a tendency to wear on emotions and brings with it a feeling of hopelessness and despair.

I understand how easy it is to grow weary and tired, to go through periods when you would rather hide away than face another day, to become overwhelmed and long for just the tiniest amount of relief.

Our lives are filled with people but sometimes it simply takes too much energy to be around them. Sometimes it’s not even being around them that’s the hard part, sometimes it’s just that putting on a real smile takes too much energy. No one likes to fake-smile their way through a day, but sometimes we do it because we have no other option.

Know that you aren’t alone. I think everyone hits a place in their MS journey when depression becomes real, tears flow, reality sets in, and choices have to be made. Hard choices. How do you bounce back from a deep, dark place of despair? How do you shake feelings that are so overwhelming that you find yourself drowning? How do you learn to live again when you feel as if there’s nothing left to live for?

Please know that it’s okay to ask for help. There’s nothing wrong in reaching out to your doctor or others for support and there’s nothing wrong in choosing to take a medication to help you get through the turmoil you find yourself in. I know how hard it can be, but don’t try to make it alone. We need one another and we need to be able to talk about what’s happening deep inside without fear of being judged or not taken seriously.

I know it’s not easy, but you can rise above the chaos. You can pull out of the messiness that life throws at you and rise above it all to a better place; a place filled with hope, smiles, laughter and joy. It starts with you taking care of you first.

When you feel like you are sinking deeper and deeper into nothingness, you have to put everything else aside to focus on yourself. Yes, you are that valuable. You are that important. You are that special. You matter!

Never apologize for who you are. You are going to make it through even this. It’s okay to be real, to hurt, to be human. Let the tears flow but if you find yourself hanging out in the puddles for too long, please, please, please reach out for help. There really is hope for a better tomorrow.

If you know someone who’s depressed, please resolve never to ask them why. Depression isn’t a straightforward response to a bad situation; depression just is, like the weather.

Try to understand the blackness, lethargy, hopelessness, and loneliness they’re going through. Be there for them when they come through the other side. It’s hard to be a friend to someone who’s depressed, but it is one of the kindest, noblest, and best things you will ever do. ― Stephen Fry

MS Gets on My NervesMS WarriorMS Superhero

 

What A Multiple Sclerosis warrior looks like

Multiple Sclerosis is weird. You can wake up one morning feeling okay and the next wishing you didn’t wake up at all. It messes with your body, your emotions, your relationships, and your job. It has this way of touching every part your life.

MS is definitely not a disease you can keep to yourself. We try though…don’t we? I know I do. I try hard to keep it neatly contained in its own little space but it doesn’t seem to stay where I want it to.

If only people could see inside my life for a day and experience not just the physical symptoms of MS, but the emotional, relational, and financial challenges it brings along with it. Oh, my…they’d be running for the hills to hide away.

MS is something I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy, but it is something I wish everyone could experience for a day so they would have a bit more understanding, compassion and patience with me. This way, when I’m having a bad day, I don’t have to work so hard trying to explain myself and having to convince people that my pain and struggles are real.

Today I woke up and my hands wouldn’t cooperate. The tremors were a bit more intense than I have experienced in times past. As a matter of fact, my entire body feels like an earthquake has exploded in 10 different directions. Nothing is working as it should. But I peck out my thoughts and send my heartfelt message of encouragement to you because I don’t want anyone to feel defeated, alone or hopeless. I don’t want anyone to give up.

If I can do it, you can do it. We got this.

We didn’t ask for this fight. I don’t know anyone who picked MS out of a lineup and said “I want that disease for the remainder of my life.” We didn’t cause it nor can we end it. The only thing we have left to do is to fight or give up, and giving up is not an option.

You see, MS warriors are made in the struggle. You are my hero because you fight battles every day that no one will ever see or know about. You wield your sword and fight gallantly even when your knees buckle under you and it’s hard to hold your head up. Never doubt, not for a moment, your strength because even on your weakest days you are strong.

Fight on, oh mighty warrior. Fight on!

MS Gets on My NervesMS WarriorMS Superhero

 

When Multiple Sclerosis messes with your taste buds

Just when I think multiple sclerosis can’t get any weirder, I’m proven wrong. The past few days my ability to taste has diminished considerably. My morning coffee has become more of a habit drink than a savory experience. It tastes like warm something…I just don’t know what that something is.

I made some lemon chicken yesterday for dinner but couldn’t enjoy it. It had a wonderful aroma, looked amazing, but the taste just wasn’t there. In the end I didn’t eat much of it. That’s concerning because ensuring proper nutrition is very important to anyone dealing with MS, or any other chronic illness, and I’m having to get a bit creative to ensure I do.

I have some meal replacement drinks that are chock-full of minerals and vitamins, and I find they are currently easier to manage than an entire meal that I can’t enjoy. I will have to keep a bit more track of the foods I eat, or don’t eat, so I don’t end up losing weight unnecessarily…although who wouldn’t want help losing a few extra pounds? 

Today I am going to make some tomato soup for lunch and maybe try a salad but that may be pushing it. We’ll see.

I’m ready for my taste buds to return to normal, I just wish my life would as well. That may be too much wishing for one day. I pray, work hard to stay healthy and keep a daily schedule of exercise, muscle massage and brain therapy.  If I see a shooting star tonight I will definitely give it a wish. Hey, anything is worth a try. 

Don’t let Multiple Sclerosis make you feel as miserable mentally as your body actually feels

There have beens days when I have looked over the entirety of my life and wished things were different. I have even envied people who are not disabled. What? I shouldn’t think like that?

Sure that’s easy to say, but thoughts happen, and in my head they seem to happen more often than I care to admit. I don’t think you would want to live a day in my head. It’s kind of scary in there. I can think of some pretty crazy ideas and have some equally wild pity-party moments.

I’m not going to lie and say that I’ve never wanted things to be different, because I have. Those thoughts seem to appear when the struggle is at its worst…when my muscles stop working, my brain takes a vacation and pain intensifies.

I could let my disability ruin my day and cause me to become as miserable mentally as my body actually feels, or I could let it help me learn to appreciate the little things in life that we tend to take for granted. Things like the fact that my roof isn’t leaking, my shower works, someone somewhere loves me, and multiple sclerosis may be a part of my life but it’s not who I am.

One thing living with a disability has taught me is that there is so much to be thankful for. I think of the people who won’t have the opportunity to get through today and that’s enough to make me appreciate everything I have, whether it’s pain, the inability to do something or the complications MS throws my way.

I can overcome anything if I take my day and break it up into tiny bite-sized chunks. A friend once told me that it’s easy to eat an elephant. Not a real elephant, mind you. I wouldn’t even want to do that. But a giant obstacle you are facing. She said you do it one bite at a time. So that’s how I break my day up…one bite at a time. I may find things hard to swallow at times, but when I keep at it, I find that I’m able to get through anything that comes my way. That impossible elephant suddenly becomes possible.

I may end up weary, bruised and tattered when the day comes to a close, but regardless of the struggle I will hold my head high and keep pushing on. Other people…I doubt they would be able to get through an hour in my MS body, let alone a day.

Take time to enjoy the little things in life that bring you joy. Allow yourself time to smile. Appreciate the roses and the sunsets along with the splinters and stormy skies. Hold on to the good in life and don’t let it go.

Lately I’ve become more home bound than any other time in my multiple sclerosis journey

Lately I’ve become more home bound than any other time in my multiple sclerosis journey. Sometimes I welcome the solitude and enjoy my alone time, but more and more it seems to come accompanied with depression, feelings of worthlessness, and tears.

Last week I was invited to a dinner scheduled for last night. It was something I had been looking forward to getting out of the house to be a part of. I had even laid out the clothes I was going to wear, but at the last minute I had to cancel because MS just wasn’t cooperating. Between vertigo, blurred vision, tremors and weakness, I just wouldn’t have made a very good dinner guest.

I crawled into bed after letting the person know that I couldn’t come and broke down into tears. The sobbing, snorting kind of tears. I felt so alone, so useless. No one tells you when you get diagnosed with MS that life has the possibility of changing like that. But you know, I have a feeling that even if they had told me, I probably wouldn’t have believed them anyway. I always thought I was going to be the one to beat the odds.

So what do you do when life catches up with you? What do you do when MS limits you? What do you do when tears are easier to come by than smiles?

The emotional pain that accompanies these kinds of times are hardly ever understood by others, but it’s important to not let them weigh you down. Talk to those in your life who are part of your support system whether it be a family member, doctor, friend or therapist. You can’t keep everything bottled up. It really is okay to talk about what’s going on. You’re not being selfish, a burden or attention seeking when you do.

Today, I’m up early, my emotions are much calmer and I’m ready to face the challenges before me. Sure my hand is still a bit shaky and I had a hard time transferring from my bed to my chair, but it’s a new day filled with countless possibilities. I’m dressed, the weather is starting to cool down a bit which is always welcomed, and I already found something to smile about as I watch some wild turkeys in my back yard playing tag.

Don’t lose hope! Sometimes that is the only thing holding me together.

checkout

To the person behind me in the checkout lane

To the person behind me in the checkout lane yesterday at the grocery store:

As you could easily see, I am in a wheelchair. Not because I lack intelligence, am damaged, or am part of a subclass of humans. I use a wheelchair because my legs don’t work properly due to a chronic disease that has damaged the nerves in the Central Nervous System of my body. Maybe you’ve heard of Multiple Sclerosis, or MS as it is commonly referred to. If you haven’t, I won’t hold that against you. A lot of people haven’t heard of it, or if they have they don’t actually know what it is. Kind of like how I didn’t know what a self-absorbed, judgmental, narcissistic person was until I met you.

I heard your long drawn out sigh as I took longer that 5 seconds to pull out my credit card to pay for my groceries, I heard the comment you made to your friend about disabled people being a burden to society, and I noticed how you so conveniently refused to make eye contact when I turned to look your way.

At first I was going to say I’m sorry to you and your friend, but then I thought…no, I’m not sorry. I’m not sorry for any delays in your schedule because you ended up behind me in line. I’m not sorry for the discomfort you felt watching me fumble with the zipper on my purse or because I took longer than you wanted while pulling the credit card from my wallet. I’m not sorry for taking time to greet the cashier with a warm smile and pleasant conversation even though I stumbled with my words. I’m not even sorry for being in a wheelchair or having MS.

You know what I am sorry for? I’m sorry for people like you who are so shallow that you only think of yourself, and in turn miss out on many beautiful moments in life. I’m sorry for whatever happened to you in your childhood or in times past that caused you to become so callous and smug. I’m sorry for how alone you actually are inside and for the hurts you are secretly carrying around with you everywhere you go. I’m sorry that the only way you can feel good about yourself is to put another person down.

I’m sorry because you are the real disabled…not me. I’m just someone living with MS.

Sincerely,
Penelope Conway
(Is this one of those times I can hit someone upside the head and blame it on MS?….Oops, sorry, that was an involuntary spastic moment.)

The ABC’s of Multiple Sclerosis

A life with Multiple Sclerosis is filled with some crazy moments. It’s not a disease for wimps, that’s for sure. Take some time to learn more about the things those of us living with MS face.

A – awareness
There is still a huge lack of understanding by the general public about MS. We are not contagious, we didn’t do something to cause MS in our lives, there is no known cure and it’s not all in our head…well actually it is. Our brain MRIs prove that.

B – brain lesions
That’s just a fancy way of saying that our brain has wounds inside. Some of them heal well while others leave a nasty scar that disrupts the nerves used to make our body work. That’s the reason we do the things we do…most of the time. Some times it’s just who we are and has nothing to do with our brain.

C – cramps and spasms
Our muscles tighten up causing us great discomfort and pain. Any muscle can be affected from those controlling our tongue to our ribs to our big toe. Think of it as a constant Charlie Horse, just not always in the leg.

D – drunk walking
We have full intentions of walking without bumping into things but it seems the walls, floors, tables and chairs are our friends. They need some appreciation from time to time and we get to be the ones giving it to them.

E – eyesight problems
Our vision can become blurred, doubled, dimmed or even gone. Sometimes it’s even accompanied with pain and color loss. So if you see us wearing uncoordinated clothes or find us making funny squinting faces while reading a menu, no need to stare…that’s just how we roll.

F – falling down
We are professionals at falling. It’s our specialty. We can fall up a flight of stairs, getting out of bed, and even on flat surfaces. If there was an Olympic Sport for falling, we would be gold medal winners for sure.

G – good days and bad days
We don’t plan them…they just happen. Some days are good, some are bad and others are downright terrible. That doesn’t change over the years so if you ask if we are feeling better we don’t know how to respond. How we feel can change from day to day, hour to hour and minute to minute. Feeling better? Compared to what? Yesterday? This morning? Ten minutes ago?

H – heat sensitivity
Trips to the beach on a hot summer day, time in a hot tub or sauna, or even blowdrying our hair causes our symptoms to worsen. Air conditioning is a must. We are thankful for its inventor and would give him an award if we could.

I – IV steroids
Oh, the dreaded round of IV meds. Most of the time they help to lessen the inflammation in our brain and spine, but they create such terrible insomnia while we are on them that we may end up scrubbing the floors, power washing the house, detailing the car and painting the basement. Just don’t look at us the wrong way because they also cause terrible mood swings and have the potential of turning us into the Incredible Hulk.

J – jitters
We make a great omelet and can whip those eggs to perfection with our hand jitters. If only we didn’t keep dropping the whisk in the process.

K – krazy mixed up words
Toss our vocabulary into a blender and let the words get chopped to bits. Now dump them out and try to form a sentence or even a word…that’s about how easy it is for us to find our words at times.

L – laughing through the tears
We cry and cry often (most of the time you don’t even know it), but we laugh too and many times you will find us laughing through the tears. That’s not a sign of weakness. Our tears are just some of our strength leaking out. But don’t worry, give us a hug, spend some time with us or help us out when we need it…that’s all we need to be replenished.

M – memory problems
Sometimes it’s hard to remember schedules, appointments, names and even what someone said 5 minutes ago. Thoughts get lost more than our car keys. If only we had a “clapper” to help us find them.

N – numbness
Many parts of our body go numb much like when someone crosses their legs and their foot falls asleep. Oddly enough, we feel pain through the numbness. If only we could get them to wake up. We would gladly offer them some caffeine or an energy drink if it would help.

O – oops, oh well
Asking us to catch something when you throw it to us, and us actually catching it…now that would be something to cheer about. See, we get excited over the little things.

P – pain and more pain
Our pain isn’t because we hit our thumb with a hammer. At least that kind of pain you could see. No, our pain shifts and changes throughout the day and at times can become unbearable. So much so that even wearing socks or covering up with a sheet in the bed hurts.

Q – quiet please
Loud noises can be super annoying and seem to become amplified in our heads, so if you see us sitting in the quiet…we like that. Loud parties, restaurants and get togethers are taken in moderation so we don’t overwhelm our nervous system.

R – relapses happen
It’s just a part of life with MS…it’s called a progressive disease for a reason. It may take years for a relapse to happen or only months…though we pray for it to be years.

S – swallowing difficulties
It’s amazing how many muscles and nerves coordinate to do something as simple as eating. One nerve out of whack and we could swallow wrong. It takes concentration and effort to chew and swallow. That old saying mom use to say…don’t talk with your mouth full…we understand that all too well now.

T – tingling
Pins and needles is what we call it and they don’t go away no matter how much we try to massage that area. It’s something we learn to live with and try to ignore. But ignoring that kind of thing is about as easy as ignoring a spider crawling next to your leg.

U – UTI
No, that doesn’t stand for Under The Influence although we very well could be with all the meds we take. Our bladder causes us difficulties. It’s not something we like to talk about, but it is a reality of what we have to deal with. So when we say we have to go to the bathroom, don’t stop us. We may run you over.

V – vertigo
We don’t need to buy a ticket for an ocean cruise, we have one in our head every day. If only we could get a few Hawaiian shirts, drinks with little umbrellas in them and an all you can eat bar to make it feel more festive.

W – wheels, canes and braces
Oh the fun we get to have pimping out our walkers, wheelchairs, canes and braces. Now if someone could invent a zapper that we could use on people when they are rude to us because of our disabled parking tags or slow moving we’d be in business.

X – X-rays and MRIs
The rat-tat-tat noise of an MRI machine can be slept through. We know that from experience. Our medical charts are filled with images of our insides. I guess you could call us Super Models…we are so photogenic.

Y – yawn, yawn, yawn
We have a constant yawn from the moment we wake up until the time we go to bed. Being able to wake up rested is a fairy tale in a land far, far away that no one has found yet. It must be around the corner from Neverland or next to the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

Z – zings down the spine
If you want to know what it feels like to stick your finger in a light socket, just ask. Looking down at our toes while standing…zing, there it goes. A lightning bolt down the back of the neck and all the way to our toes. Maybe that’s what helps to light up the light bulb over our head when we get a bright idea.

Dear Multiple Sclerosis, you’ve messed with the wrong person

Dear Multiple Sclerosis,
I want you to know that you are not the boss of me. Sure, you have made my life a living hell. You may have caused me countless tears. You may be the reason I had to quit my job, have lost seemingly great friendships, and am facing unprecedented financial difficulties. You may make my body weak, my thoughts a jumbled mess, my body tremble and my vision blurry, but you will never, and I mean NEVER, have the satisfaction of stealing my hope.

Hope is what keeps me going when I feel overwhelmingly discouraged and depressed. It gives me the strength I need when I’m feeling completely worn out from fighting every day. It helps me keep my head held high and my heart strong when, in reality, I feel as if I have lost every bit of passion and courage I thought I had left.

You see, I have hope in a better tomorrow.
I have hope that one day a cure will be found.
I have hope that my life matters to the people I come in contact with, both online and in person.
I have hope that, regardless of the struggle, I will find a smile to brighten my day.
I have hope that there are still good, caring, honest, loving people in this world who are willing to stand up for the disabled to help us fight.
I have hope in the 2.5 million people in the world living with Multiple Sclerosis, that each one of us finds the strength we need to keep pushing on.

MS, I know your plan is destruction, but no matter how hard you try, I will not be defeated. I am a warrior…and that’s what warriors do…we rise up!

We may make it through our day exhausted, weary, and feeling like a complete and total wreck, but we will not give up. You’ve messed with the wrong group of people. We are fighters, we are strong, we are mighty, and we NEVER give up…hear us ROAR!

Multiple Sclerosis…it’s just all in your head

Some mornings I wake up and simply don’t have the strength to get out of bed. I truly wish everything we go through each day was all just in our heads like some people believe. Those are people without MS who don’t understand the kinds of limitations we live with.

I guess you could really say it’s all in our heads though since our brains are filled with lesions; or how I like to say to people…it’s full of scars.  That’s what Multiple Sclerosis actually means anyway—multiple scars. Only for me I have a spine full of them too. Those scars are what’s causing all our problems and messing up our ability to walk, talk, think and feel.

Right now as I’m writing this, I’m in the bed struggling to type on my laptop due to blurred vision, a weak and trembling right hand, pain in my feet and an uncomfortable catheter tube coming out of my belly. All in my head? I wish it was all in my head.

When people say that to me—and yes, it has happened before—I want to smack them in the head. You know, I could actually do that and blame it on MS calling it an MS spastic twitch. All in my head? Really?

To those experts I say…I wish you could live in my body for a day. You would quickly give up your degree in neurology. Oh, wait, you didn’t go to medical school. You got all your schooling from Aunt Sally Sue down the street and Google University. In that case, you need to fire Aunt Sally Sue and even more importantly learn that 9 times out of 10, Dr. Google is WRONG. Yes, I said that.

But really, the internet isn’t what’s wrong. It’s people. We live in this weird period in time where people try to solve all of the world’s problems with bite-sized theories, opinions, one-liners and memes. Gone are the days of real knowledge. Opinions have become truth and everyone is an expert.

I know most people’s parents probably told them that they could do anything, but they didn’t mean in 10 minutes by reading something on the internet. Knowledge can be powerful, but you can’t misinterpret a tiny glimpse of information about Multiple Sclerosis and then declare to the world that you know all about it.

The next time someone says to me that MS is all in my head, I’m going to smile and say, “When did you get your degree from Google University? That’s a BS degree, right? Congratulations!”

life

To whom it may concern: An open letter about life with Multiple Sclerosis

To whom it may concern:

There is an entire world filled with people who don’t understand Multiple Sclerosis. I know since you don’t live with the disease yourself it is hard to comprehend, but I hope what I have to say will give you insight into what life is like for me…giving you insight and understanding into the life of someone living with MS.

First off, I would like to say that Multiple Sclerosis is real, it hurts, it is full of challenges and struggles, and if you haven’t figured it out yet, it is invisible to a majority of the population since the destruction takes place inside the body. The effects are seen in other ways as I walk, talk and go through my day with disabling symptoms, but if you were able to see inside my body, you wouldn’t judge me so quickly. My insides are a wreck and filled with chaos.

Sure, I wear a smile much of the time, but that doesn’t mean the disease isn’t there. It just means I’m doing a pretty good job at covering it up. You see the mask I wear, but let me pull off the mask for a moment. I get angry, fearful, weepy and scared. Lingering in the back of my mind is the fact that one day my future will be drastically different than it is today. You see, MS is progressive. That means that although today I may be moving around okay, tomorrow I may not. It may take a year or 20 years, but my life is changing every day.

Please know that it hurts when you so casually decide you know what’s best for me. MS has affected every part of my life, but that doesn’t mean it’s made me incapable of making decisions. Don’t exclude me from things just because you think I wouldn’t want to be a part or because you think it would be too hard for me to do. Let me make that decision. It hurts more to be left out than to give a response of “no thank you” to an invitation. I would much rather be given the option. Please don’t stop inviting me or including me even if you get a lot of “No” replies.

Another thing that really hurts is when you tell me you know how I feel. Really? You understand the fatigue that never goes away, the numbness in my body, the pain, the bladder problems, the vision struggles? I have major damage in my brain and spine causing continued chaos throughout my body, and you want to try and compare your flu symptoms to my MS? Please don’t do that. Unless you are living with MS yourself, don’t even try telling me you know how I feel. Support me, help me, console me if that’s needed, but don’t make the assumption that you get it.

Then there’s the problem I have of you always trying to fix me as if I’m broken. I’m not broken. I’m simply living with a chronic progressive incurable disease. That means it’s not going away unless a cure is found…and no, there isn’t a cure yet. All those supposed cures you read about online, they aren’t cures. They are either symptom management techniques, wishful thinking, or money making schemes. Nothing has been found to completely remove MS from someone’s life. Nothing aside from a miracle! So your great Aunt Sue’s cousin’s friend who was cured using a combination of bumble bees, tin foil, baking soda and pine cones…I’m not interested in the recipe. Accept me for who I am. I’m thankful you care, but your remedies cause me more weariness than help.

Something else I’d like to say…for some reason you have this need to ask me if I’m feeling better every time you see me. As I’ve said before, MS is progressive so that question truly has no answer. Feeling better than what or when? Yesterday? Ten minutes ago? Last year? Instead of always asking me if I’m feeling better, treat me like everyone else. There are more things to talk about in life than my having MS. I don’t want that to be the center of conversation every time we meet. I am more than my MS. I am still me and would much rather talk about gardening, traveling, architecture or the funny thing I saw yesterday on the side of the road. Don’t ignore my struggle, but don’t make it a continual focus either.

Please know that I have my bad days and at times terrible, horrible really awful days. Getting out doesn’t make them better either. In actuality, going out has the potential of making them worse. Me doing more will not make my MS symptoms less. Yes, exercise is important, but it has to be done carefully. That old saying “no pain, no gain” will not work for me. If I get to the point of pain, I have pushed too far and my body is going to rebel for days, if not weeks. I have to do everything carefully and with great planning. Sometimes my bad days happen within minutes of a good moment. That’s just how rebellious my body can be. So please don’t tell me I need to get out more or I just need to lose weight to feel better. That’s not the cause of my struggle and it is not the answer to my pain.

So, the next time you decide you want to judge me for my bad days, bad moods or even my bad responses to your insensitivity, keep these things in mind…

I am the same person I was before my MS diagnosis. I am intelligent, caring, full of fun, loving, ready to laugh at any given moment, and a great friend. I also have the potential to be angry, moody, and frustrated. All still part of who I am. I would like nothing more than for MS to be cured, but as of today that reality doesn’t exist. Please don’t look at my disability as if that’s all that I am. I am still me…MS and all. The only difference is that I need a lot more love, support, care and understanding. I would much rather have someone fighting alongside me than against me.

Signed,
An MS Warrior
(Penelope Conway, Positive Living with MS)

P.S. Please share this with your friends, family, co-workers, and neighbors. Multiple Sclerosis awareness is needed all around the world.