The ABC’s of Multiple Sclerosis

A life with Multiple Sclerosis is filled with some crazy moments. It’s not a disease for wimps, that’s for sure. Take some time to learn more about the things those of us living with MS face.

A – awareness
There is still a huge lack of understanding by the general public about MS. We are not contagious, we didn’t do something to cause MS in our lives, there is no known cure and it’s not all in our head…well actually it is. Our brain MRIs prove that.

B – brain lesions
That’s just a fancy way of saying that our brain has wounds inside. Some of them heal well while others leave a nasty scar that disrupts the nerves used to make our body work. That’s the reason we do the things we do…most of the time. Some times it’s just who we are and has nothing to do with our brain.

C – cramps and spasms
Our muscles tighten up causing us great discomfort and pain. Any muscle can be affected from those controlling our tongue to our ribs to our big toe. Think of it as a constant Charlie Horse, just not always in the leg.

D – drunk walking
We have full intentions of walking without bumping into things but it seems the walls, floors, tables and chairs are our friends. They need some appreciation from time to time and we get to be the ones giving it to them.

E – eyesight problems
Our vision can become blurred, doubled, dimmed or even gone. Sometimes it’s even accompanied with pain and color loss. So if you see us wearing uncoordinated clothes or find us making funny squinting faces while reading a menu, no need to stare…that’s just how we roll.

F – falling down
We are professionals at falling. It’s our specialty. We can fall up a flight of stairs, getting out of bed, and even on flat surfaces. If there was an Olympic Sport for falling, we would be gold medal winners for sure.

G – good days and bad days
We don’t plan them…they just happen. Some days are good, some are bad and others are downright terrible. That doesn’t change over the years so if you ask if we are feeling better we don’t know how to respond. How we feel can change from day to day, hour to hour and minute to minute. Feeling better? Compared to what? Yesterday? This morning? Ten minutes ago?

H – heat sensitivity
Trips to the beach on a hot summer day, time in a hot tub or sauna, or even blowdrying our hair causes our symptoms to worsen. Air conditioning is a must. We are thankful for its inventor and would give him an award if we could.

I – IV steroids
Oh, the dreaded round of IV meds. Most of the time they help to lessen the inflammation in our brain and spine, but they create such terrible insomnia while we are on them that we may end up scrubbing the floors, power washing the house, detailing the car and painting the basement. Just don’t look at us the wrong way because they also cause terrible mood swings and have the potential of turning us into the Incredible Hulk.

J – jitters
We make a great omelet and can whip those eggs to perfection with our hand jitters. If only we didn’t keep dropping the whisk in the process.

K – krazy mixed up words
Toss our vocabulary into a blender and let the words get chopped to bits. Now dump them out and try to form a sentence or even a word…that’s about how easy it is for us to find our words at times.

L – laughing through the tears
We cry and cry often (most of the time you don’t even know it), but we laugh too and many times you will find us laughing through the tears. That’s not a sign of weakness. Our tears are just some of our strength leaking out. But don’t worry, give us a hug, spend some time with us or help us out when we need it…that’s all we need to be replenished.

M – memory problems
Sometimes it’s hard to remember schedules, appointments, names and even what someone said 5 minutes ago. Thoughts get lost more than our car keys. If only we had a “clapper” to help us find them.

N – numbness
Many parts of our body go numb much like when someone crosses their legs and their foot falls asleep. Oddly enough, we feel pain through the numbness. If only we could get them to wake up. We would gladly offer them some caffeine or an energy drink if it would help.

O – oops, oh well
Asking us to catch something when you throw it to us, and us actually catching it…now that would be something to cheer about. See, we get excited over the little things.

P – pain and more pain
Our pain isn’t because we hit our thumb with a hammer. At least that kind of pain you could see. No, our pain shifts and changes throughout the day and at times can become unbearable. So much so that even wearing socks or covering up with a sheet in the bed hurts.

Q – quiet please
Loud noises can be super annoying and seem to become amplified in our heads, so if you see us sitting in the quiet…we like that. Loud parties, restaurants and get togethers are taken in moderation so we don’t overwhelm our nervous system.

R – relapses happen
It’s just a part of life with MS…it’s called a progressive disease for a reason. It may take years for a relapse to happen or only months…though we pray for it to be years.

S – swallowing difficulties
It’s amazing how many muscles and nerves coordinate to do something as simple as eating. One nerve out of whack and we could swallow wrong. It takes concentration and effort to chew and swallow. That old saying mom use to say…don’t talk with your mouth full…we understand that all too well now.

T – tingling
Pins and needles is what we call it and they don’t go away no matter how much we try to massage that area. It’s something we learn to live with and try to ignore. But ignoring that kind of thing is about as easy as ignoring a spider crawling next to your leg.

U – UTI
No, that doesn’t stand for Under The Influence although we very well could be with all the meds we take. Our bladder causes us difficulties. It’s not something we like to talk about, but it is a reality of what we have to deal with. So when we say we have to go to the bathroom, don’t stop us. We may run you over.

V – vertigo
We don’t need to buy a ticket for an ocean cruise, we have one in our head every day. If only we could get a few Hawaiian shirts, drinks with little umbrellas in them and an all you can eat bar to make it feel more festive.

W – wheels, canes and braces
Oh the fun we get to have pimping out our walkers, wheelchairs, canes and braces. Now if someone could invent a zapper that we could use on people when they are rude to us because of our disabled parking tags or slow moving we’d be in business.

X – X-rays and MRIs
The rat-tat-tat noise of an MRI machine can be slept through. We know that from experience. Our medical charts are filled with images of our insides. I guess you could call us Super Models…we are so photogenic.

Y – yawn, yawn, yawn
We have a constant yawn from the moment we wake up until the time we go to bed. Being able to wake up rested is a fairy tale in a land far, far away that no one has found yet. It must be around the corner from Neverland or next to the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

Z – zings down the spine
If you want to know what it feels like to stick your finger in a light socket, just ask. Looking down at our toes while standing…zing, there it goes. A lightning bolt down the back of the neck and all the way to our toes. Maybe that’s what helps to light up the light bulb over our head when we get a bright idea.

Dear Multiple Sclerosis, you’ve messed with the wrong person

Dear Multiple Sclerosis,
I want you to know that you are not the boss of me. Sure, you have made my life a living hell. You may have caused me countless tears. You may be the reason I had to quit my job, have lost seemingly great friendships, and am facing unprecedented financial difficulties. You may make my body weak, my thoughts a jumbled mess, my body tremble and my vision blurry, but you will never, and I mean NEVER, have the satisfaction of stealing my hope.

Hope is what keeps me going when I feel overwhelmingly discouraged and depressed. It gives me the strength I need when I’m feeling completely worn out from fighting every day. It helps me keep my head held high and my heart strong when, in reality, I feel as if I have lost every bit of passion and courage I thought I had left.

You see, I have hope in a better tomorrow.
I have hope that one day a cure will be found.
I have hope that my life matters to the people I come in contact with, both online and in person.
I have hope that, regardless of the struggle, I will find a smile to brighten my day.
I have hope that there are still good, caring, honest, loving people in this world who are willing to stand up for the disabled to help us fight.
I have hope in the 2.5 million people in the world living with Multiple Sclerosis, that each one of us finds the strength we need to keep pushing on.

MS, I know your plan is destruction, but no matter how hard you try, I will not be defeated. I am a warrior…and that’s what warriors do…we rise up!

We may make it through our day exhausted, weary, and feeling like a complete and total wreck, but we will not give up. You’ve messed with the wrong group of people. We are fighters, we are strong, we are mighty, and we NEVER give up…hear us ROAR!

Multiple Sclerosis…it’s just all in your head

Some mornings I wake up and simply don’t have the strength to get out of bed. I truly wish everything we go through each day was all just in our heads like some people believe. Those are people without MS who don’t understand the kinds of limitations we live with.

I guess you could really say it’s all in our heads though since our brains are filled with lesions; or how I like to say to people…it’s full of scars.  That’s what Multiple Sclerosis actually means anyway—multiple scars. Only for me I have a spine full of them too. Those scars are what’s causing all our problems and messing up our ability to walk, talk, think and feel.

Right now as I’m writing this, I’m in the bed struggling to type on my laptop due to blurred vision, a weak and trembling right hand, pain in my feet and an uncomfortable catheter tube coming out of my belly. All in my head? I wish it was all in my head.

When people say that to me—and yes, it has happened before—I want to smack them in the head. You know, I could actually do that and blame it on MS calling it an MS spastic twitch. All in my head? Really?

To those experts I say…I wish you could live in my body for a day. You would quickly give up your degree in neurology. Oh, wait, you didn’t go to medical school. You got all your schooling from Aunt Sally Sue down the street and Google University. In that case, you need to fire Aunt Sally Sue and even more importantly learn that 9 times out of 10, Dr. Google is WRONG. Yes, I said that.

But really, the internet isn’t what’s wrong. It’s people. We live in this weird period in time where people try to solve all of the world’s problems with bite-sized theories, opinions, one-liners and memes. Gone are the days of real knowledge. Opinions have become truth and everyone is an expert.

I know most people’s parents probably told them that they could do anything, but they didn’t mean in 10 minutes by reading something on the internet. Knowledge can be powerful, but you can’t misinterpret a tiny glimpse of information about Multiple Sclerosis and then declare to the world that you know all about it.

The next time someone says to me that MS is all in my head, I’m going to smile and say, “When did you get your degree from Google University? That’s a BS degree, right? Congratulations!”

life

To whom it may concern: An open letter about life with Multiple Sclerosis

To whom it may concern:

There is an entire world filled with people who don’t understand Multiple Sclerosis. I know since you don’t live with the disease yourself it is hard to comprehend, but I hope what I have to say will give you insight into what life is like for me…giving you insight and understanding into the life of someone living with MS.

First off, I would like to say that Multiple Sclerosis is real, it hurts, it is full of challenges and struggles, and if you haven’t figured it out yet, it is invisible to a majority of the population since the destruction takes place inside the body. The effects are seen in other ways as I walk, talk and go through my day with disabling symptoms, but if you were able to see inside my body, you wouldn’t judge me so quickly. My insides are a wreck and filled with chaos.

Sure, I wear a smile much of the time, but that doesn’t mean the disease isn’t there. It just means I’m doing a pretty good job at covering it up. You see the mask I wear, but let me pull off the mask for a moment. I get angry, fearful, weepy and scared. Lingering in the back of my mind is the fact that one day my future will be drastically different than it is today. You see, MS is progressive. That means that although today I may be moving around okay, tomorrow I may not. It may take a year or 20 years, but my life is changing every day.

Please know that it hurts when you so casually decide you know what’s best for me. MS has affected every part of my life, but that doesn’t mean it’s made me incapable of making decisions. Don’t exclude me from things just because you think I wouldn’t want to be a part or because you think it would be too hard for me to do. Let me make that decision. It hurts more to be left out than to give a response of “no thank you” to an invitation. I would much rather be given the option. Please don’t stop inviting me or including me even if you get a lot of “No” replies.

Another thing that really hurts is when you tell me you know how I feel. Really? You understand the fatigue that never goes away, the numbness in my body, the pain, the bladder problems, the vision struggles? I have major damage in my brain and spine causing continued chaos throughout my body, and you want to try and compare your flu symptoms to my MS? Please don’t do that. Unless you are living with MS yourself, don’t even try telling me you know how I feel. Support me, help me, console me if that’s needed, but don’t make the assumption that you get it.

Then there’s the problem I have of you always trying to fix me as if I’m broken. I’m not broken. I’m simply living with a chronic progressive incurable disease. That means it’s not going away unless a cure is found…and no, there isn’t a cure yet. All those supposed cures you read about online, they aren’t cures. They are either symptom management techniques, wishful thinking, or money making schemes. Nothing has been found to completely remove MS from someone’s life. Nothing aside from a miracle! So your great Aunt Sue’s cousin’s friend who was cured using a combination of bumble bees, tin foil, baking soda and pine cones…I’m not interested in the recipe. Accept me for who I am. I’m thankful you care, but your remedies cause me more weariness than help.

Something else I’d like to say…for some reason you have this need to ask me if I’m feeling better every time you see me. As I’ve said before, MS is progressive so that question truly has no answer. Feeling better than what or when? Yesterday? Ten minutes ago? Last year? Instead of always asking me if I’m feeling better, treat me like everyone else. There are more things to talk about in life than my having MS. I don’t want that to be the center of conversation every time we meet. I am more than my MS. I am still me and would much rather talk about gardening, traveling, architecture or the funny thing I saw yesterday on the side of the road. Don’t ignore my struggle, but don’t make it a continual focus either.

Please know that I have my bad days and at times terrible, horrible really awful days. Getting out doesn’t make them better either. In actuality, going out has the potential of making them worse. Me doing more will not make my MS symptoms less. Yes, exercise is important, but it has to be done carefully. That old saying “no pain, no gain” will not work for me. If I get to the point of pain, I have pushed too far and my body is going to rebel for days, if not weeks. I have to do everything carefully and with great planning. Sometimes my bad days happen within minutes of a good moment. That’s just how rebellious my body can be. So please don’t tell me I need to get out more or I just need to lose weight to feel better. That’s not the cause of my struggle and it is not the answer to my pain.

So, the next time you decide you want to judge me for my bad days, bad moods or even my bad responses to your insensitivity, keep these things in mind…

I am the same person I was before my MS diagnosis. I am intelligent, caring, full of fun, loving, ready to laugh at any given moment, and a great friend. I also have the potential to be angry, moody, and frustrated. All still part of who I am. I would like nothing more than for MS to be cured, but as of today that reality doesn’t exist. Please don’t look at my disability as if that’s all that I am. I am still me…MS and all. The only difference is that I need a lot more love, support, care and understanding. I would much rather have someone fighting alongside me than against me.

Signed,
An MS Warrior
(Penelope Conway, Positive Living with MS)

P.S. Please share this with your friends, family, co-workers, and neighbors. Multiple Sclerosis awareness is needed all around the world.

Things I wish more people understood about Multiple Sclerosis

Lately I think I have experienced every emotion imaginable. I have cried more than usual, lost my temper for seemingly stupid and even unknown reasons, and become more withdrawn than I ever thought possible simply because my body and brain won’t cooperate.

I can literally feel the changes happening in my life, so much so that if I allow my thoughts to linger on my increasing weakness and struggles, it scares the crap out of me. (That’s just me being honest.)

It’s hard to talk with people about those fears and the crazy emotions I deal with mainly because, 9 times out of 10, I am met with “Oh, it can’t be that bad” or “You just need to think more positively.” I find it to be exhausting trying to explain progressive MS to people who aren’t willing to actually listen.

Here are a few things I wish more people would try harder to understand about life with Multiple Sclerosis:

1. There is no cure

No matter what you read online or hear people say, there’s nothing that has been proven to eradicate the disease from a person’s body aside from a miracle. There are symptom management techniques through supplements and diet and medications that work to slow the progression down, but that’s not a cure.

2. My symptoms are unpredictable

One minute I may be doing well managing the pain, weakness, sluggish thought processes, and vision difficulties. The next minute I may need to climb into bed and be unable to move for hours. I am not being lazy. I’m taking the rest my body needs in order to function. You have to remember, it’s fighting every second of every day just to survive.

3. Things will get worse

I know you think that’s not being positive enough, but no amount of not talking about the truth will help others (or even myself) come to terms with my reality. MS is progressive. That means that as time passes, symptoms will build and my life will become more difficult. I need to prepare for the possibilities of tougher times so I’m not caught off guard when they happen. Help me to not allow my difficulties to be the only thing I focus on, but allow me the space needed to face the truth.

4. I need help

Just because I don’t ask for help every time I do something doesn’t mean I don’t need it. From my perspective, I see the burden I have become on others and know that in the future it will be an even greater need. I also know that I can’t give back like I could in times past. Those thoughts weight heavy on me at times. Regardless, never stop asking if you can help. Just the asking makes each day better because it shows me you care.

5. Please invite me

I know I am limited in the places I can go because I have to ensure accessibility and that it’s not too late or I’m not too tired, but please don’t decide for me if I can join you for a time out of the house. You may hear “no” more times than yes, but I feel included when you ask.

6. Little things matter

I know it may sound silly, but a text asking how I’m doing or just to say “thinking of you” makes any day brighter. So does picking up the mail, dropping off a meal, doing a load of laundry, taking out the trash or just sitting for a chat. Those things matter more than you will ever know.

7. Don’t get offended

I have a brain that can’t keep information in order. If I don’t remember a special date, have trouble putting words together into coherent sentences or I’m not engaged in a conversation, don’t hold it against me. Most of the time it’s difficult to keep things organized in my head. Even with lots of notes and reminders I still confuse things.

How embarrassing…

Some of my most embarrassing moments with multiple sclerosis have been bathroom related. It’s not always easy to talk about the challenges I face on a daily basis when it comes to toilets, toilet paper, and accessibility. It’s not like I can just start a conversation, “You wouldn’t believe the mess I made in less than 10 seconds flat yesterday.”

The muscles that control my bladder and bowels simply don’t work for me. No matter how hard I try, my brain will not communicate to that area of my body. Believe me, I’ve tried. A few years ago I had a suprapubic catheter surgically inserted to help with my bladder issues. It’s a catheter that is inserted in my belly and attaches to a urine bag. So basically, my bladder is an external bag that I have to periodically empty in the bathroom throughout the day.

That is one of the best things I have ever done in my MS journey. It’s not maintenance free and comes with it’s own set of challenges, but at least I don’t have the unexpected accidents like I did in times past. The only time I have bladder leakage now is when I have a kink in my catheter or have forgotten to empty the bag in time. Even with an external bag, that can happen.

I used to tell people that my bladder and the front door conspired against me on a daily basis. Every times I would make it home after I had been out, as soon as I got to the front door to unlock it, my bladder would no longer hold things in. I can’t even count how many times I had to take a shower and wash a load of laundry after I got home.

Now, my bathroom accidents mainly happen due to my bowels and me not getting to the toilet in time. The problem for me is that since those muscles are not working, I can’t flex or constrict them to help hold anything in. I get at most 30 seconds to make it to the bathroom, pull my pants down and sit on the toilet, and many times I don’t quite make it.

One thing is for sure, my abs always get a workout when I finally make it on the toilet since those are the only muscles I can still control. I should have washboard abs by now.

Is that TMI? It may be for some people, but I think open and honest conversation is always best. It helps both those with MS and those caring for someone with MS.

When I am out of the house, bathroom location is the first thing I think about. I want to know where the closest ones are and if they are wheelchair accessible. And just in case I don’t quite make it, I also keep a change of clothes with me for those unexpected moments.

Hey, s*** happens and most of the time I have no control over it.

Real friends

Living with Multiple Sclerosis will weed people out of your life

One thing multiple sclerosis has done for me is weed out the people in my life that were only there for the ride, not the journey. So many times people proudly boast about the great numbers of people they know, but are those people really friends? I can almost guarantee you that a majority of them are what I would consider fair-weather friends.

I’ve noticed that people seem to be great at hanging around when they are getting some type of reward or kick-back for being your friend. You know, the free food, tickets, perks, support that you are able to send their way, but when those things dry up and you become the one in need of their continued help, they suddenly have other things more important to do.

Life has taught me a few things—I guess you could say the hard way—about people. I have learned what true friendship is…and is not.

A friend is not…

  • the long list of people in your High School year book.
  • the person who friended you on Facebook, followed you on Twitter or added you on Instagram.
  • someone who attended your birthday party or says hello to you in passing at the office.
  • the person who gives you a piece of gum or hangs out with you at the mall.
  • someone who waves at you from across the room, bags your groceries or invites you to their wedding.

A friend is…

  • someone who is willing to go grocery shopping with you on the coldest, rainiest day of the year and allows you to change your mind ten times about which kind of cheese you want for sandwiches.
  • someone who puts up with your moodiness, hangs in there through the tears and listens when there’s nothing left to say.
  • someone you can call up at 3 o’clock in the morning to take you to the emergency room or help you with a flat tire on the side of the road.
  • someone who holds your hand when you get a bad doctor’s report and who never judges you when you have a melt down.
  • someone who genuinely wants to know how you’re doing.
  • someone who never walks away.

A friend isn’t the person who SAYS they are your friend, who SAYS they want to help, who SAYS they will be there come rain or shine…they PROVE it by the things that they do.

I hate to admit it, but I know I have become less of a friend in return for many of the people in my life mainly because MS has exhausted me both emotionally and physically to a point where I don’t have the energy to maintain forced interactions or unnecessary conversations.

An exhaustion so deep that I don’t have the strength to hold someone else up without sinking myself. I’m at a place in my life where I am the one in need of support. A true friend will understand that and choose to stay anyway.

Hang on to those true-blue friends. You won’t have many…maybe one or two, but they are worth their weight in gold.

Living with multiple sclerosis will weed people out of your life, but in the end you will be left with the beautiful roses, orchids and daisies. Treasure the people that treasure you.

When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives mean the most to us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a warm and tender hand. The friend who can be silent with us in a moment of despair or confusion, who can stay with us in an hour of grief and bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing, not curing, not healing and face with us the reality of our powerlessness, that is a friend who cares. ― Henri J.M. Nouwen

you are

You are a somebody

I had an extremely difficult time watching my career come to an end. It was the last thing I ever thought would happen, so when it did I took it hard. I did all I could to hide my cognitive problems from others. I fumbled my way through each day knowing that life was changing yet refusing to acknowledge those changes.

As a computer programmer, I could meet any challenge thrown at me and beat it. I developed some amazing systems and was proud of my accomplishments. When Multiple Sclerosis came along and began disrupting those abilities, I didn’t like it one bit. I would try programming but just couldn’t get my brain to work.

I struggled with everyday things too like trying to remember if I had washed my hair while in the shower, so I would wash it again just in case or forgetting I had something in the oven even with a timer set. Who could burn a casserole with a wonderful smell filling the house and a timer going off? Me!!! So, to get confused looking at code, the very code I, at one time, could decipher in my sleep…that was devastating.

The day I made my decision to resign, I cried. Not just one tear either, a flood and an ocean of tears. I covered it up well, but my heart was broken. Having to walk away from my job made me feel like a failure.

It’s been close to three years now and I still miss my job. I find myself trying to do in depth programing from time to time, but can’t seem to do it without a cheat sheet for even the simplest of tasks. I’m still smart, I’m still me…I’m still a somebody.

I do my best to stay focused on the big picture. My career wasn’t who I was. It was only a part of my life. I am so much more than the things I can do…and so are you. For some reason, we put our identity in things that don’t really determine who we are. You aren’t a chef, or a fireman, or a store clerk, or a nurse. You are an amazing, wonderful, strong, inspiring person who has a lot to give even in your weakest moments.

I know it’s scary, the unknown. “How will I? How can I? What about? What next?” I know, it’s terrifying to take a step forward when you can’t even see the road in front of you. But regardless of how you feel, I can tell you with confidence that you aren’t a failure, stupid or broken. You are a somebody…and being a somebody is the best thing anybody could ever be.

When you have to think to swallow…

One of the scarier moments for me in this life with multiple sclerosis is when my throat closes up and refused to allow me to swallow. Many times I have to actually convince those muscles to actually function. Last night was one of those times.

I had water by my bedside, elevated the head of my hospital bed, reached over for my cup then took a sip. I held that water in my mouth a good two or three minutes as I tried to swallow. At one point I even thought about spitting it out but eventually was able to get it down. The harder times is when it goes down the wrong way and I end up having a coughing fit.

And people wonder why we are always so exhausted. Maybe it’s because we have to work overtime all day long in order to do the things everyone else takes for granted. When you have to think to walk, think to swallow, think to remember words, think to even scratch your nose…well, that’s a lot of exhaustive thinking and would wear out even the healthiest person around.

I wish there was a switch I could flip to make my muscles work as they were intended or a program I could write to override the glitches in my system. That would make my days so much easier to manage and would be a welcomed improvement.

My morning coffee is not as enjoyable as it used to be but I still make myself a cup each morning anyway. Sometimes I don’t get it all down and end up pouring half of it down the drain…but sometimes I don’t. This morning I finished my cup and for that I’m thankful. It’s the little things in life that really matter anyway.

Life has drastically changed because of multiple sclerosis but I will never give up looking for rainbows in the chaos. This morning I found a rainbow in my coffee cup, tomorrow maybe I will find it in the laundry. Hey, anything’s possible!

Don’t quit…not now, not ever

Have you ever felt like your whole life was falling apart before your very eyes and no matter how hard you tried you couldn’t do anything to stop it? That the very ones you thought would stand beside you forever turned and walked away? That in each passing day a wave of hopelessness flooded your heart and clouded your mind, inching you closer and closer to simply giving up? That just the thought of facing one more day filled your heart with tremendous pain, fear and too much uncertainty to manage?

If you have ever felt this way before, just know that you are not alone. I have been there too.

People who know me, know that I’m not a quitter…I never have been. I face everything with the confidence that I will overcome. But there have been times when I’ve felt like giving up and waving the white flag of defeat. I’m not immune to having the feelings of being overwhelmed, weak and uncertain.

I read a story once about Emperor Tamerlane who was badly defeated in battle. He ran from the battle and  hid himself away in a barn. Enemy troops searched the countryside for him. By this time he was depressed, his troops had been terribly defeated and scattered, and he didn’t know what he was going to do.

It was then that he noticed an ant trying to push a giant kernel of corn up over a stone wall. As he watched this ant attempt to do the impossible, he counted its futile efforts to see how many times the ant would try until it gave up.

One, two, three… twenty… forty… sixty-nine times the ant tried and failed to push the kernel over the wall. But in one last push, on the seventieth try, the ant made it. Leaping to his feet, Tamerlane excitedly said to the ant, “If you can do it, then so can I.” That day he changed his outlook, reorganized his forces, went back and defeated the enemy.

I wish more people understood that every day living with multiple sclerosis I am attempting the impossible, and just like that ant I fail more than once…but I don’t quit. I push, get exhausted, try again, fail, rest, but still get up and try some more. My entire life seems to be one giant push. I push through pain, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, muscle spasms, and lack of sleep. I push and keep on pushing at everything I do. Nothing comes easy, not even something as simple as a trip to the mailbox.

Sometimes each one of us needs a little ant to remind us that we can do it. That this fight is worth it. That we can make it. Today, let me be that ant.

Don’t quit. Don’t let the fact that MS is a part of your life cause you to feel defeated. You can’t stop trying. You can’t stop pushing that kernel of corn. Don’t let MS win. You got this…now PUSH!